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Dreaming in Disko Bay

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I was out on deck early the morning we entered Disko Bay. Fog surrounded the ship, hazy blue-grey into infinity, light rain and calm seas. As I watched, a giant iceberg appeared through the mist, looming ominously before it faded away into oblivion. Another appeared, then yet another. Soon the ship wove carefully through a landscape of ice, each piece as unique as an individual person. “It was as if they had been borne down from a world of myth, some Gotterdammerung of noise and catastrophe”, Barry Lopez had written. “Fallen pieces of the moon”. I stared out in wonder at their silence and their magnitude.

 

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Greenland's World Cup Fever Lasts All Year Long: Get in the Game!

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Quark passengers and crew join locals in a game of football in Nuuk, Greenland in 2013.

A number of things come to mind when we think of Greenland: stunning vistas, spectacular Northern Lights and awe-inspiring fjords among them.

But football [a.k.a. soccer in North America]?

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Spotlight on Thule - Beyond the World’s Edge

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Known today as Qaanaaq, the Inuit town formerly known as Thule lies in Greenland amid the country’s ice sheets and midnight sun. One of the northernmost inhabited places on the planet, it was originally named after the mythical, unchartable northern islands in ancient Greek and Roman literature. Thule was first referenced by Greek explorer Pytheas in 330 BC as a region where land and sea and air all met together, in a weird and uninhabitable mixture.

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Fluffy flowers

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The Arctic cottongrass is the most widespread flowering plant found in the northern hemisphere and Arctic tundra regions. Cotton grass is not actually a type of grass, but rather a plant that flourishes in areas that are too cold for trees.

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Climate as Culture: Artists near the Arctic Circle

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Greenland and the Canadian Arctic, while geographically far removed from the galleries of New York and London, hold a solid place on the international arts scene. Each steeped in thousands of years of Inuit history, they are culturally significant destinations on our Arctic Quest voyage.

The second-largest settlement in Greenland, Sisimiut has managed to maintain their small fishing village vibe with picturesque harbour walkways and a bustling arts community. Houses dating as far back as the settlement of the colony in 1756 stand proud alongside the blue church, inaugurated in 1775.

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Arctic Quest: Cultural & Geographical Contrasts from Greenland to Churchill

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Arctic Quest, our most diverse Arctic expedition, is popular among wildlife lovers, adventurers and historians alike. This is a journey of contrasts, where you may find yourself alternately immersed in Inuit culture, in awe of naturally magnificent icy fjords, and even enjoying close encounters with walrus or polar bears.

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Visit Greenland: Interview with Malik Milfeldt

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Malik Milfeldt, Senior Consultant, at Visit Greenland

Malik Milfeldt, Senior Consultant, at Visit Greenland, stopped by Quark's offices to chat about culture and travel in Greenland. Below are 5 questions we asked Malik about this beautiful country:

1. What is the symbolism behind the Greenland flag?

The flag of Greenland was designed by local artist (and Greenland native) Thue Christiansen. The flag was adopted in 1985 and features the Danish colors. The white is symbolic of the ice and snow that covers most of the island, and the red is symbolic of the sun shining over the land.

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Arctic Quest : Greenland to Churchill

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Our most diverse Arctic expedition aboard our new ship, the Sea Explorer. In addition to wildlife excursions by Zodiac and tundra hikes, you’ll spend time visiting fishing villages and Inuit settlements, taking time to learn about their heritage and culture. A wonderful expedition to a part of the world where polar bears, whales, seals and humans have all learned to co-exist for thousands of years.

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In the Footsteps of Franklin: Greenland & Canada's High Arctic

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Explore the best of Greenland’s west coast on this 13 day voyage, including one of the fastest and most active glaciers in the world. Crossing into the Canadian waters en route to Resolute, you’ll encounter spectacular limestone bird cliffs and Beechey Island, landing site of the Franklin Expedition.

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Greenland Explorer Part 2: Guest blog from Lynsey Devon

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Whilst on our outing, an exploration on land was in order, so we paddlers left our boats with Dave the zodiac driving guru and ventured on to land to check out the abandoned village. It was a great start to the voyage’s kayaking program with the vixen of a kayak leader, Val Lubrik. Chatting with Val, it was easy to see that she was impassioned about why this is such a fab trip. She said it was the Quark people that make the difference. The staff are passionate, professional and diverse with a strong sense of adventure and fun. They come from all around the world and truly enjoy what they do. Their passion and energy are contagious. Quark Expeditions make the most of every available opportunity. And because they are specialised, in that they reach places that are off the beaten track, all the secret hideaways are known by their experienced crew and Expedition teams. The ships are small but spacious and offer an intimate experience as well as the opportunity for good fun and learning with staff and other guests.

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