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Dreaming in Disko Bay

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I was out on deck early the morning we entered Disko Bay. Fog surrounded the ship, hazy blue-grey into infinity, light rain and calm seas. As I watched, a giant iceberg appeared through the mist, looming ominously before it faded away into oblivion. Another appeared, then yet another. Soon the ship wove carefully through a landscape of ice, each piece as unique as an individual person. “It was as if they had been borne down from a world of myth, some Gotterdammerung of noise and catastrophe”, Barry Lopez had written. “Fallen pieces of the moon”. I stared out in wonder at their silence and their magnitude.

 

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Guest Post: Antarctica through the Eyes of an Arctic Aficionado by Andrew White

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As someone who has truly been bitten by the Arctic bug, I was chomping at the bit to see Antarctica. And as the newest member of the Quark sales team, I was looking forward to seeing a Quark expedition in action. Like most salespeople it is easier to sell something you have experienced and even easier if you are genuinely passionate about it. Would it stack up to my experiences in the Arctic? Would I be able to sell Antarctica as passionately as I can sell the Arctic? And more importantly, would I get sick crossing the Drake Passage? (Yes. Yes. And NO!)

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Part 1: Journey to the Arctic with Janet & John Tangney

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Janet & John Tangney have been married for almost 41 years and live in Oregon. John's full time job is writing Computer Aided Design software, and Janet was previously a pre-school teacher and substitute teacher for high school special education class. While John is a photo enthusiast, Janet also enjoys the hobby. They primarily go to National Parks in the USA on their travels, and love the Northwest. John had previously gotten to go to Antarctica with Quark Expeditions, and hopes to be able to return to there with Janet in a couple of years. They have a website, www.pbase.com/jctangney where they post photos for all to view and enjoy.

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Pleneau Island: Iceberg Alley

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Pleneau Island is located west of Booth Island at the southern end of the Lemaire Channel and features an array of iceberg scenery. In fact, an astonishing ninety-three percent of the world’s mass of icebergs is found surrounding the Antarctic. The word "iceberg" actually comes from partial Dutch translation meaning "ice mountain." The term iceberg refers to chunks of ice larger than 5 meters (16 feet) and smaller chunks of ice are known as bergy bites (how cute!) and growlers. While Antarctic icebergs last typically ten years and Arctic bergs about two years, what's interesting to note is the glacial ice that icebergs are made of could be more than 15,000 years old!

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The Spectacular Lemaire Channel

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7 miles of sheer beauty!

Renowned as one of the most beautiful parts of the world, the Lemaire Channel runs between the mainland of the Antarctic peninsula and Booth Island, off the Graham Coast.

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Featured passenger photo: Spitsbergen Cruising

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This photo was sent to us by passenger Lotte Furlong, who recently traveled with us on our Spitsbergen Explorer voyage. Lotte was kind enough to send us a few fantastic photos from her expedition, and had this to say about her trip:

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Creating new Antarctic Ambassadors

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A few of us Quark Expeditions recently had the pleasure of attending our first Google+ hangout with some grade one students from Quaker Ridge School in Scarsdale, NY.

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Explore Greenland

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From unique cultures and rare wildlife to majestic landscapes and towering icescapes, Greenland is beyond imagination.

Describing Greenland as multicultural might seem a little unorthodox, however when you learn about its rich Viking history, the journey of the Dorset people, as well as the Greenlandic people and the Danish immigrants, you’ll agree that Greenland is a melting pot of old and new mores.

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Reasons to visit East Greenland

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If Greenland is known for one thing, it is probably its amazing views of the Aurora Borealis. Known to most as the “Northern Lights,” this majestic display of natural light in the northern sky is breathtaking to say the least.

The Greenlandic people believe the dancing of the Northern Lights are their “ancestors’ spirits playing football [soccer] in the sky.” Some of the best displays in August and September can be found near Scoresbysund Fjord where the white and green colours dance around the night’s sky. Meteorologists say that 2013 will have the best display of lights in over a decade. So take a blanket, a hot drink and sit back and enjoy the show on a clear night!

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Glacier Calving

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A dramatic moment captured as a glacier calves during a Three Arctic Islands expedition in September 2012. Photo courtesy of Frede Hansen.

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